Shinrin-Yoku =
"Forest Bathing"
in n.a. Commonly Called
Forest Therapy

About Shinrin-Yoku: 
Shinrin-Yoku (Japanese for 'Forest Bathing') is known commonly in North America as Forest Therapy. An experienced Forest Therapy Guide leads you through a natural area using carefully worded and timed 'Invitations.' These invitations help you 'escape your mind' while experiencing the forest through your other senses, including hearing, sound, taste, and many others.
Scientific research has demonstrated that this technique can have many healing effects on the walker in many ways, including reduced stress, lowered blood pressure, alleviating depression, stabilizing moods, and many more.  
More time in forests near wetlands, in prairies, and savannas, helps reconnect you back to nature - 'the more-than-human world,' regaining natural rhythms, assisting in digestion, sleep and often lead to a life of less stress.

The forest is the therapist....the guide opens the door....

The forest is the therapist....the guide opens the door....

OVERVIEW of a Typical Shinrin-Yoku/ Forest Bathing Walk

Duration of Walk: Walks are usually a minimum 1.5 hours and are more often 2 - 3 hours in duration. 

Length of Walk: Distance covered during walks is often between 1 and 3 km.

Pace of Walk: Moving at a slow pace, with several sitting breaks in between the 3 to 6 optional "Invitations." 

Location of Walk: Walks are planned in various locations across Ontario and in other parts of the world. Please check in for our list of scheduled walks.  
Fee: Between $40 and $70 CDN (or $30 & $55 USD) for a 2.5 to 3hr walk. Fee depends on agreement with local landowner/manager. 

Life moves fast. You're busy. You're stressed. You're looking for a way to slow down. We'd like to invite you to take a breath, awaken your senses, and reconnect to the Earth. This is Shinrin Yoku.

To see the schedule of Shinrin-Yoku/ Forest Therapy Walks, Click Button Below.

Forest therapy...invitation to interact with the flow of the shallow creek. 

Forest therapy...invitation to interact with the flow of the shallow creek.